How often do you look at your net worth?

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KJ: How often do you look at your net worth? Weekly, monthly, quarterly, yearly, never? Why or why not?

I track our net worth on a monthly basis, and we review it together during our quarterly presentations. Yep, you read that right. For those of you who do not know us, we actually have a presentation that we review each quarter with information on investment performance, net worth changes, and other financial highlights for the quarter. We used to do a comprehensive cash flow each quarter, but since I’ve fallen behind on tracking it in Quicken, the numbers aren’t as reliable. Sure Mint.com has a lot (or mostly all) of the information, but since we stay on top of our net cash flow each month, the quarterly figures aren’t as useful. It’s fun (and shocking) to look at periodically even if you know what you spend each week or month. There’s something about seeing some of the figures on a quarterly or annual basis that makes you wonder, “we spent how much at [insert retailer or restaurant]!?”

AJ: I know we’ve talked about our quarterly presentations before but looking at our net worth on a quarterly basis helps me understand where we are without getting too caught up in the tiny details that occur month to month. Ensuring we’re on track monthly helps keep us from having to catch up later, but I leave the monthly net worth review to Kirby so I don’t go crazy :).

Why track monthly?
So, why do I track our net worth monthly? Short and simple: to see if we’re on trend with our goals. It helps keep front of mind when we have a lot of goals that are very long-term in nature. Otherwise, it’s easy to let them slip by the wayside and lose sight of what the end goals may be.

Tracking it on a daily or weekly basis would probably make you go insane, but tracking it on a monthly basis still gives you the regular updates you need in order to stay on track. Plus, if you start tracking it regularly when you are younger, you’ll begin to learn how much investment performance and the whims of markets can impact an account in the short-term – a valuable lesson to learn sooner rather than later!

What do we track?
Well, everything we can think of to track that represents an asset we own except household valuables and furnishings. We include our house, cars, cash value life insurance, investment and retirement accounts, savings, etc.

What don’t we track?
For administrative simplicity, we don’t track jewelry, silver, furniture, furnishings, etc. in our overall picture. One-off expensive jewelry, art, wine, etc. could be included if you felt it were meaningful, but in most instances, it’s not something you would look to sell to raise cash anyways.

We also don’t track checking accounts or credit cards on our net worth. Since we keep relatively minimal amounts in our checking account from time-to-time other than to meet cash flow obligations, it’s not useful to show in our net worth figures. Same goes for credit cards, since we pay them in full each month, it doesn’t do any good to show the value. Technically, we could show the difference of the checking accounts and credit cards to come up with the net figure each month, but for simplicity, we do not. However, if you do have any type of credit card or loan balance that is carried over from month to month, then you would want to make sure it is properly included (i.e. reducing your net worth).

How do we get values?
Some items are easy to value like your 401(k) or investment accounts that have regular daily values. These most often come from online account summaries or statements that are easy to access. Try to use the same date for valuations, otherwise you might be double-dipping! If you have a deposit or transfer in transit, you could be including it in the value of the receiving account, yet it still hasn’t been deducted from the sending account, so make sure you’re not overstating a value.

Other items like a home and cars are a little less easy to value.

I try not to make any adjustments to the value of the house unless a meaningful event has happened (mostly a significant decline in prices in the neighborhood like 2008 and 2009 showed most of us), but I seldom increase the value of our home. In fact, I even take off 6% of the estimated value to show the true, net estimated costs of selling with all the realtors fees and transaction costs involved if we were to sell it.

For the cars, probably about once or twice per year I’ll head on over to Kelly Blue Book.com to check out the current values of our cars. They don’t change a whole lot, but it’s good to be realistic (and conservative) about the values we’re showing them at, so I usually round down.

If we had business interests, we would include that, but we don’t at this point in time. That part of your net worth may be the most tricky to value, and it is likely to be infrequently valued (probably at most once per year).

Do we use after-tax figures in our net worth?
The short answer is no, but if you really think about it, shouldn’t you show the after-tax value of your retirement accounts? Seeing as how we’ve tried to put as much as we can in Roth accounts, they’re essentially after-tax funds anyways, so we don’t make any adjustments. However, Angela has a 401(k) that is pre-tax that we could consider reducing by our tax rate. Maybe this will be a change we make going forward, but this has just added one more step in complexity to tracking it, so I haven’t taken the plunge to make the adjustment to show our after-tax net worth specifically. It’s really not difficult to do, and I would highly encourage you to make the adjustment particularly if it’s a very significant part of your net worth.

Take the value of your account and multiply it by (1-Tax Rate). So, if you’re in the 25% tax rate, and your account is $10,000, then you would take $10,000 (1 – 0.25) to get a result of $7,500 to show on your balance sheet. A pretty meaningful adjustment though when you think of the impact on a large pre-tax account!

    How often do you look at your net worth?
    Do you exclude the value of anything from your net worth?
    Do you look at the after-tax figures?

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2 thoughts on “How often do you look at your net worth?

  1. I track my net worth every single month. Updating my net worth more frequently than that would drive me absolutely INSANE! I think it’s interesting that you don’t include your checking accounts, but if you’re running a zero-based-style budget (like what I’m TRYING to do), it really shouldn’t matter.

    • Yeah, too much frequency would be enough to drive you crazy! For our checking account, we typically round down a little bit for what we save each month, so over time, our checking account actually has a built up “slush” in it over time, but we still like to exclude it since we’re targeting a zero sum type of game.

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