Are you working like the job you want to get paid for?

3D Business Man Going UpstairsKJ: This post is dedicated to those of you who are career climbers in your organization – do you get paid for the job that you do now or do you work like the job you want to get paid for? It’s quite the philosophical question when it comes to your job for the people you hire (if you manage people) and for your outlook on your own career. They’re vastly different points of view. One implies that you get paid for anything and everything you do. The other implies that you prove yourself of sorts to be able to get paid for the job you ultimately want and for a job well done.

Why wouldn’t you get paid for the job that you do?
Sure, that sounds reasonable, right? I mean, come on! Under what scenario would someone not get paid for the job that they are doing? I bet if you asked your friends, though, each one could come up with a list of 5-10 things that they do each week that’s not a core part of their job description or “what they get paid for.”

AJ: I loathe people who say “that isn’t my job.” Keeping your job is your job, right, so how can anything you’re asked to do NOT be your job? Be known as a do-er and what you’re doing now probably won’t be all you’re doing for very long because do-ers get noticed!

KJ: So, how do you transition to a philosophy wherein you work for the job that you want to get paid for? Here are a few ways to re-frame your perspective and expectations.

Understand you’re not where you want to end up
The current job you have is likely to be a lower point (pay or responsibility – they don’t always go hand-in-hand!) than where you will be in 10-15 years. If you’re a driven person, then the career and role you hold today is likely to be but a low man on the totem pole for what you want out of your career.

Prove your worth to the people around you
Volunteer for tasks, projects, or assignments. Don’t just sit idly by and assume that someone is going to hand a better position or increased pay to you on a silver platter when the time is right and you’re perfectly ready. Sometimes you have to take a little risk and step out of your comfort zone when the right opportunity comes along. There’s a lot to be said for someone who takes action and steps up when no one is asking.

Prove your worth to the people outside of your office
Whether it’s directly related to your line of work or through your favorite volunteer organization, try to go the extra mile in showing your value and commitment to the overall team – wherever that may be. Most things these days have little to do with the individual themselves, but more so on the progress of the overall team.

Prove your worth to the people inside your office
If your team members are floundering, then find a way to help motivate them to step up their game. Sometimes just a little notice of encouragement goes a long way to really building the morale of your team, so you can feed off one another’s drive and successes to make your organization better. Keep in mind that the whole of the organization can be greater than the sum of the individual parts.

Be professional
You never know when an opportunity will arise and knock on your door, so being professional in all your encounters will work wonders for the doors of opportunity that will open along the way.

    Do you get paid for what you do?
    Do you work like it’s the job that you want?
    What motivates you to push yourself just a little further to take initiative?

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